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Scaling Up High-Quality Social-Emotional and Character Development in All Schools: A Set of Policy Recommendations to the US Secretary of Education

  • Maurice J. Elias
  • Samuel J. Nayman
  • Joan C. Duffell
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

In this chapter, we make the case and propose policy recommendations to the US Secretary of Education, as well as state commissioners of education and other educational leaders, on how to effectively scale up high-quality social-emotional and character development (SECD) in all schools. First, we define SECD, social-emotional learning (SEL), and related competencies, identify effective approaches to developing these competencies through universal school-based programming, and summarize the known individual, social, and economic benefits of systematic efforts to promote these competencies in schools. Next, we review the current state of US education policy with regard to SEL and SECD, including the scope of program implementation, state standards, preservice and in-service teacher development, evaluation and assessment, and funding. We end the chapter with a set of policy recommendations on how to leverage existing strengths and build further capacity for making SECD an integral and seamless component of the education system.

Keywords

Social-emotional and character education (SECD) Social-emotional learning (SEL) Education policy Program implementation Action research State standards  

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maurice J. Elias
    • 1
  • Samuel J. Nayman
    • 2
  • Joan C. Duffell
    • 3
  1. 1.Rutgers UniversityPiscatawayUSA
  2. 2.Rutgers University-New BrunswickNew BrunswickUSA
  3. 3.Committee for ChildrenSeattleUSA

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