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Rule Makers vs. Rule Breakers: The Impact of Legislative Policies on Women Game Developers in the Japanese Game Industry

  • Tsugumi Okabe
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Games in Context book series (PAGCON)

Abstract

This chapter asks whether there is a need to recruit and retain more women developers in the Japanese game industry. From a series of semi-structured interviews with women game developers in Japan, I explore this question focusing on how the legal and social dimensions of professional contexts impact women’s participation in game development. This chapter is dedicated to the women who were interviewed for this study, and who continue to pave a path for other women in the industry.

Keywords

Japanese game industry Women game developers Motherhood Gender and professionalization 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Dr. Geoffrey Rockwell and Dr. Mia Consalvo for their unwavering support and generous funding that made this project possible. I am also grateful to the editors for their guidance and many helpful suggestions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tsugumi Okabe
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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