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Radiotherapy in Anterior Mediastinum Cancers

  • Alfonso ReginelliEmail author
  • Anna Russo
  • Fernando Scala
  • Elisa Micheletti
  • Roberta Grassi
  • Mario Santini
  • S. Cappabianca
Chapter
Part of the Current Clinical Pathology book series (CCPATH)

Abstract

Radiotherapy treatment in anterior mediastinum cancers can be performed with curative, adjuvant, palliative/symptomatic intent. The mediastinal tumors of radiotherapy interest are represented by thymic tumors, mediastinal localization of lymphomas, germinal tumors, and superior vena cava obstruction (SVCO). For the first two groups of tumors, the therapy is established according to the staging of the disease. For the germinal tumors, radiotherapy in non-seminomatous forms has a secondary role only in residual disease after systemic therapy. Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is caused by the evolution and expansion of intrathoracic tumors or by the affected mediastinal lymph nodes, and the treatment is according to the primitive tumor.

Keywords

Radiotherapy Mediastinal masses Germinal tumors Superior vena cava obstruction Thymic tumors 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfonso Reginelli
    • 1
    Email author
  • Anna Russo
    • 1
  • Fernando Scala
    • 1
  • Elisa Micheletti
    • 1
  • Roberta Grassi
    • 2
  • Mario Santini
    • 3
  • S. Cappabianca
    • 1
  1. 1.Radiology and Radiotherapy Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineUniversità degli Studi della Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”NaplesItaly
  2. 2.Radiotherapy Unit, Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences “Mario Serio”University of FlorenceFlorenceItaly
  3. 3.Thoracic Surgery Unit, Department of Translational Medical ScienceUniversità degli Studi della Campania ‘Luigi Vanvitelli’NaplesItaly

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