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Civil Service Management in Nepal

  • Shree Krishna Shrestha
  • Narendra Raj Paudel
Chapter

Abstract

The modern Nepalese Civil Service was established through the promulgation of the first Civil Service Act in 1956. The Act and its regulations have been amended five times since 1961, resulting in revised policies on recruitment, transfer, promotion, training, retirement, fringe benefits, grievance-handling methods, and unions. The latest amendments (2014) are based on a New Public Management approach to governance, the objective being to achieve efficiency and effectiveness. Thus far, no comparative study has been made of the amendments to the Civil Service Act, its regulations, and emendations. What changes have occurred? This chapter aims to answer this by analysing the recruitment process and promotion system in the Nepalese Civil Service during the Shah period (1768–1846), the Rana Regime (1846–1951), and up to today. It analyses the salary and other benefits provided to civil servants based on their performance, examines the training provided to enhance their capacity and performance, and discusses cross-cutting issues faced by the NCS today.

Keywords

Nepalese Civil Service Civil service management Recruitment Promotion Nepal 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shree Krishna Shrestha
    • 1
  • Narendra Raj Paudel
    • 1
  1. 1.Public Administration Campus, Central Department of Public AdministrationTribhuvan UniversityKirtipurNepal

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