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Committees, Floor, and the Four Types of Senators

  • Hirokazu Kikuchi
Chapter
Part of the IDE-JETRO Series book series (IDE)

Abstract

This chapter offers background information to understand senatorial behavior in Argentina. Referring to official documents published by the Senate, it describes that committee decision-making is consensus-based, and almost all unapproved presidential initiatives are killed before being scheduled to be discussed. It also recognizes the conventional wisdom that the partisan dimension dominates the floor voting. In addition, the chapter introduces a typology of senators according to the varieties in their principals at the subnational level, and claims that overrepresentation of the periphery provinces as well as decentralized party organizations makes Argentine governors important political players at the national and provincial levels, while their tenure stability varies considerably across provinces.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Developing EconomiesJapan External Trade OrganizationChibaJapan

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