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Decreasing the Vulnerability to Climate Change in Less Favoured Areas of Bihar: Smart Options in Agriculture

  • Anshuman Kohli
  • Sudhanshu Singh
  • Sheetal Sharma
  • S. K. Gupta
  • Mainak Ghosh
  • Y. K. Singh
  • B. K. Vimal
  • Vinay Kumar
  • Sanjay Kumar Mandal
Chapter

Abstract

Anthropogenic climate change results from developmental activities across various sectors including agriculture. Threats resulting from these have variously been proposed to be manageable with mitigation and adaptation mechanisms by the stakeholders. The population inhabiting the less favoured environments is much more vulnerable to climate change. Despite the potential to produce under designated management, these environments have not received the due attention for development initiatives. This could partially be because of the lack of infrastructure facilities and partly also due to the tendency to concentrate in the comfort zone. Hence management adaptations that can directly influence the responsive indicators of climate change such as the concentration of green house gases in the atmosphere could be promising. System intensification is an unambiguous choice keeping in view the increasing population. Subtle climate smart technologies are also available as simple production techniques that can potentially reduce the vulnerability to climate change such as competent cultivars and cropping systems apart from time tested modifications in production practices. System diversification is a key component of disaster risk reduction and seen as a tool for reducing vulnerability to climate change. Precision nutrient management for smallholders aided by IT enabled tools helps in filling the deficit between the crop needs and indigenous nutrient supply of the soil for rational yield targets and results in saving fertilizers, increase fertilizer use efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions vis-a-vis conventional management. Sustainable biochar technology can trap atmospheric carbon dioxide in the soil for a time scale of the order of thousands of year and at the same time improve crop productivity and soil physical conditions.

Keywords

Climate change Ahar-pyne system Biochar 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anshuman Kohli
    • 1
  • Sudhanshu Singh
    • 2
  • Sheetal Sharma
    • 2
  • S. K. Gupta
    • 3
  • Mainak Ghosh
    • 3
  • Y. K. Singh
    • 1
  • B. K. Vimal
    • 1
  • Vinay Kumar
    • 1
  • Sanjay Kumar Mandal
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Soil Science and Agricultural ChemistryBihar Agricultural University, SabourBhagalpurIndia
  2. 2.International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)New DelhiIndia
  3. 3.Department of AgronomyBihar Agricultural University, SabourBhagalpurIndia
  4. 4.Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Jagatpur, BankaBihar Agricultural UniversityBhagalpurIndia

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