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Psychosocial and Educational Implications of Diabetic Foot Complications

  • Katie Weinger
  • Arlene Smaldone
  • Elizabeth A. Beverly
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Diabetes book series (CDI)

Abstract

Although interest is increasing, behavioral aspects of the diabetic foot remain emerging science. Researchers are only now beginning to investigate the psychological response to diabetic foot ulceration and amputation and the behavioral and psychological factors that influence self-care. Although cross-sectional and short-term studies have explored these areas, little long-term longitudinal data currently exist. In this chapter we review the current state of behavioral science pertaining to individuals with diabetic foot disease including barriers to prevention, precipitating factors, and therapeutic interventions. The first section describes some of the behavioral/psychological issues faced by individuals with diabetes during the course of their illness. We describe four phases of psychological responses and attempt to relate these phases to the prevention, diagnosis, or treatment of foot problems. Then, we discuss quality of life for those with peripheral neuropathy, lower extremity wounds, or amputations. Next, we discuss depression, its impact on self-care, signs and symptoms, and implications of treatment. Finally, we describe measurement instruments, strategies, and interventions that may be useful for clinicians either to incorporate into their clinical practice or as a referral for struggling patients.

Keywords

Psychosocial Behavioral Diabetes foot education Quality of life Depression Adjustment 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katie Weinger
    • 1
    • 2
  • Arlene Smaldone
    • 3
    • 4
  • Elizabeth A. Beverly
    • 5
  1. 1.Behavioral ResearchJoslin Diabetes CenterBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Nursing and Dental Behavioral SciencesCUMCNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Scholarship and Research, School of NursingColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  5. 5.Department of Family MedicineOhio University Heritage College of Osteopathic MedicineAthensUSA

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