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Contributory Factors Leading Behavioral Health Disability

  • Pamela A. Warren
Chapter

Abstract

There several ways that iatrogenic BH disability can occur through actions of (1) the individual, (2) TPs, (3) employers, (4) attorneys, and (5) insurers. The contributions and nuances of each and how these multiple factors can lead to iatrogenic BH disability will be examined further.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela A. Warren
    • 1
  1. 1.Carle Physician Group and University of Illinois Medical SchoolDepartment of PsychiatryMonticelloUSA

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