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Prevalence of Behavioral Health Concerns

  • Pamela A. Warren
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the breadth of behavioral health (BH) concerns in greater detail. While there has been an increasing trend of BH disability claims, there are also multiple issues that occur within the treatment and management systems that serve to prolong them. Moreover, because there is a lack of standardization in identifying and treating BH concerns, each professional plays a role in the current iatrogenic disability process. These primary issues that occur within the BH disability management process will be discussed further in order for a consumer of clinical services to be of these potential pitfalls that lead to iatrogenic BH disability.

Keywords

Behavioral health disability prevalence Psychology Disability Stakeholders Problematic professional training Subjectivity in assessment Inappropriate psychological treatment HIPAA Psychological functional impairment Disability Comorbid psychological and physical conditions Causality Malingering 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela A. Warren
    • 1
  1. 1.Carle Physician Group and University of Illinois Medical SchoolDepartment of PsychiatryMonticelloUSA

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