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The Soft Tissues

  • Mary M. Salvatore
  • Ronaldo Collo Go
  • Monica A. Pernia M.
Chapter

Abstract

The visualized soft tissues on chest CT include the breast tissue, muscles, and subcutaneous tissue and should be viewed on mediastinal window settings on axial images (Level 40, Window 400). I recommend beginning with the right side and scrolling from superior to inferior and then left side inferior to superior. Women are having fewer mammograms currently. The indications for chest CT are increasing as lung cancer screening received approval for reimbursement by Medicare (www.Medicare.gov). Therefore, the only opportunity we may have to diagnose breast cancer early is on a CT scan of the chest. It is imperative that the scanned breast be included on the images provided to the radiologist for interpretation and they are often not included so that the field of view for evaluating the lung parenchyma is not compromised. A viable solution is to include the entire breast on soft tissue windows only and allow lung windows to be optimized for evaluation of the lung.

Keywords

Breast density Gynecomastia Subcutaneous emphysema Pneumomediastinum Breast prosthesis 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary M. Salvatore
    • 1
  • Ronaldo Collo Go
    • 2
  • Monica A. Pernia M.
    • 3
  1. 1.RadiologyIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep MedicineCrystal Run Health CareMiddletownUSA
  3. 3.Internal MedicineNew York Medical College - Metropolitan Hospital ProgramNew YorkUSA

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