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Experiences of Black Women in Academe: A Comparative Analysis

  • Talia Esnard
  • Deirdre Cobb-Roberts
Chapter

Abstract

Despite a long history of Black women in academe across both contexts, we contend that they continue to be underrepresented at the higher echelons of academe and face a myriad of intersecting yet complex challenges that structure their roads to tenure and promotion. In grounding our claim, we engaged in an extensive meta-synthesis of the literature around Black women in academe. We started this meta-synthesis with a search for keywords around Black women in academe, promotion, and tenure for Black scholars, Black women faculty, marginalization of Black women in academe and Black women in higher education.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of the West IndiesSt. AugustineTrinidad and Tobago
  2. 2.University of South FloridaTampaUSA

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