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Preventive Models for Reducing Major Causes of Morbidity and Mortality in Childhood

  • Jeanelle J. Sugimoto-Matsuda
  • Deborah Goebert
Chapter

Abstract

Healthcare and public health are complementary disciplines, yet best practice tools are not always shared and applied between disciplines. The public health approach encourages providers to not only limit their attention to the patient and family but also consider individual and family interpersonal relationships, the organizations and communities to which they belong, and larger societal influences that impact health as well as to participate in advocacy. This chapter provides an overview of key public health principles, approaches, and tools useful and relevant to pediatric consultation-liaison psychiatrists and uses vignettes to demonstrate practical application in enriching wellness of patients, families, organizations, and communities.

Keywords

Advocacy Child and adolescent Consultation-liaison Prevention Public health Social determinants Social ecological model Tool kit Vignette 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanelle J. Sugimoto-Matsuda
    • 1
  • Deborah Goebert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, John A. Burns School of MedicineUniversity of Hawai‛i at MānoaHonoluluUSA

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