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Creating a Higher Breed: Transhumanism and the Prophecy of Anglo-American Eugenics

  • Susan B. Levin
Conference paper

Abstract

How we assess current calls for vigorous, or “radical” (Agar 2010, 2014), enhancement through befitting procreative choices depends in part on the plausibility of supporters’ rejecting all substantive ties between their views and earlier eugenics. When denying such connections, today’s advocates of vigorous enhancement (i.e., transhumanists) routinely emphasize that enhancement decisions would stem from individuals and families, not the state. In a multipronged critique, I show the untenability of transhumanists’ denials.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Smith CollegeNorthamptonUSA

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