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The Use of Digital Technologies in Quality Teaching of Chinese

  • Robyn Moloney
  • Hui Ling Xu
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Teaching and Learning Chinese book series (PSTLC)

Abstract

This chapter features the application of digital technologies from our case study secondary teachers’ practice, to illustrate the changes occurring in the learning and teaching of Chinese. New technologies can greatly facilitate students’ own initiative, providing them with personalised learning opportunities to make choices, to create tasks, to use games, to interact with others, to explore media, and to engage in language and culture simulations. The chapter details the specific affordance of technologies in the various areas of learning including acquisition of characters, speaking, writing, vocabulary and grammar, independent learning, learning and teaching management, and differentiated learning. The chapter summarises the benefits to students and teachers, in supporting motivated quality teaching and learning of Chinese.

Keywords

Digital technology Technology-enhanced pedagogy Chinese learning and teaching Secondary schools Task-based learning Gamification Quality Teaching Framework Motivation 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robyn Moloney
    • 1
  • Hui Ling Xu
    • 2
  1. 1.School of EducationMacquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia
  2. 2.Department of International StudiesMacquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia

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