Advertisement

Mahmoud: ‘The Sorrow Which Has No Vent in Tears May Make Other Organs Weep’ (Dr. Henry Maudsley 1895; British Psychiatrist)

  • Mahnaz Sekechi
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

Mahmoud’s story is the narrative of an individual whose trajectory has taken him from an active life involving revolutionary zeal, political activities and university teaching and writing in Iran to being injuriously ill and in need of ongoing health care during his exile in London. Despite his social suffering, loss of health, socio-economic downgrading and family issues, Mahmoud remains positive about his circumstances in exile. It is his body, it seems, that bears the effect of his losses and encapsulated sadness; his suffering is embodied.

References

  1. Akhtar, S. (1995). A third individuation: Immigration, identity and the psychoanalytic process. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 43, 1051–1084.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Alford, C. F. (2006). Psychology and the Natural Law of Reparation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bollas, C. (1987). The Shadow of the Object: Psychoanalysis of the Unthought Known. London: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
  4. Bollas, C. (2007). The Freudian Moment. London: Karnac Books Ltd.Google Scholar
  5. Boulanger, G. (2004). Lot’s wife, Cary Grant, and the American dream: Psychoanalysis with immigrants. Contemporary Psychoanalysis, 40, 353–372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bourdieu, P. (1977). Outline of a Theory of Practice. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Clarke, S. (2008). Psycho-social research: Relating self, identity, and otherness. In S. Clarke, H. Hahn, & P. Hoggett (Eds.), Object Relations and Social Relations: The Implications of the Relational Turn in Psychoanalysis. London: Karnac.Google Scholar
  8. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM 5): American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.Google Scholar
  9. Freud, S. (1917). Mourning and melancholia. In J. Strachey (Ed. and Trans.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. XIV. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  10. Freud, S. (1933). New introductory lectures on psychoanalysis. In J. Strachy (Ed. and Trans.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. XXII. London: Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
  11. Frosh, S. (2010). Psychoanalysis Outside the Clinic. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Frost, L., & Hoggett, P. (2008). Human agency and social suffering. Critical Social Policy, 28(4), 438–460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Grinberg, L., & Grinberg, R. (1984). A psychoanalytic study of migration: Its normal and pathological aspects. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association, 32(1), 13–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gunaratnam, Y. (2013). Death and the Migrant: Bodies, Borders and Care. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  15. Heimann, P. (1950). On counter-transference. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 31, 81–84.Google Scholar
  16. Hoggett, P. (2008). Relational thinking and welfare practice. In S. Clarke, H. Hahn, & P. Hoggett (Eds.), Object Relations and Social Relations: The Implications of the Relational Turn Psychoanalysis. London: Karnac Books Ltd.Google Scholar
  17. Honneth, A. (2005). The Struggle for Recognition: The Moral Grammar of Social Conflicts. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  18. Hollway, W., & Jefferson, T. (2000). Doing Qualitative Research Differently: Free Association, Narrative and the Interview Method. London: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hollway, W., & Jefferson, T. (2012). Doing Qualitative Research Differently: Free Association, Narrative and the Interview Method (2nd ed.). London: Sage.Google Scholar
  20. Khan, M. (1963). The concept of cumulative trauma. The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 18, 286–306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Klein, M. (1940). Mourning and its relations to manic-depressive states. In M. Klein (Ed.), Love, Guilt and Reparation and Other Works 1921–1945 (1998). London: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
  22. Klein, M. (1988 [1946]). Notes on some schizoid mechanisms. In M. Klein (Ed.), Envy and Gratitude and Other Works 1946–1963. London: Virago Press.Google Scholar
  23. Laplanche, J., & Pontalis, J. B. (1973). The Language of Psychoanalysis (D. Nicholson-Smith, Trans.). London: Karnac Books.Google Scholar
  24. Maudsley, H. (1895). The Pathology of Mind. London: Macmillan & Co.Google Scholar
  25. McDougall, J. (1989). Theatres of the Body: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Psychosomatic Illness. London: Free Association Books.Google Scholar
  26. Nettleton, S. (2016). The Methodology of Christopher Bollas: An Introduction. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  27. Park, R. E. (1928). Human migration and the migrant man. American Journal of Sociology, 33, 881–893.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Said, E. (2001). Reflections on exile. In E. Said (Ed.), Reflections on Exile: And Other Literary and Cultural Essays. London: Granta Books.Google Scholar
  29. Stonequist, E. V. (1965). The Marginal Man: A Study in Personality and Culture Conflict. New York: Russell & Russell.Google Scholar
  30. Symington, N. (2016). A Different Path: An Emotional Autobiography. London: Karnac Books Ltd.Google Scholar
  31. Roseneil, S. (2011). On meeting Linda: Exploring the psychosocial dimensions of (not) belonging. Paper delivered Institute of Public Knowledge, New York University (Unpublished).Google Scholar
  32. Wengraf, T. (2013). BNIM 5-day materials booklet two—Interpretation. Available at tom@tomwengraf.com.Google Scholar
  33. Werbner, P. (2004). Pakistani migration and diaspora religious politics in a global age. In M. Ember, C. Ember & I. Skoggard (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Diaspora: Immigration and Refugee Cultures Around the World. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  34. Wilkinson, I. (2005). Suffering: A Sociological Introduction. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  35. Wolpert, L. (2006). Malignant Sadness: The Anatomy of Depression (3rd ed.). London: Faber and Faber.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahnaz Sekechi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychosocial StudiesBirkbeck, University of LondonLondonUK

Personalised recommendations