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Gol: Flight to Freedom

  • Mahnaz Sekechi
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

Gol’s story is an example of an individual who worked within the establishment, took part in the Iran/Iraq War, and wanted to be able to live in the home country to ‘reap the fruit’ of his lifetime of labour. This was impossible as he found himself repeatedly confronted with, in his words, ‘lies, deceit and hypocrisy’. Gol left Iran when he was in his early 50s. His life as an immigrant and later political asylum seeker, has involved enormous loss of social, cultural, economic and relational capital leading to encapsulated sadness. He has used adaptive strategies to endure exiled living and his sadness has endowed him with an enriching depth of feeling that illuminates his narrative.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahnaz Sekechi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychosocial StudiesBirkbeck, University of LondonLondonUK

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