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Historical Context: The Iranian Revolutions of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries and the Struggle for Freedom

  • Mahnaz Sekechi
Chapter
Part of the Studies in the Psychosocial book series (STIP)

Abstract

This chapter examines historical, socio-economic and political factors that led to the revolution of 1979 in Iran and its aftermath, especially in terms of women’s loss of legal/social rights. The chapter includes references to the Iran/Iraq War in which one million young men died—a war that is hardly mentioned in the West. It also provides a background of over 100 years of Iranians’ struggle for freedom and establishing the rule of law, shadowed by difficulties in maintaining democracy even when modica of democracy were achieved. The chapter explores policies of the Islamic Republic as well as aspects of the problem of blending Islam and republicanism and the effect of fundamentalistic government on Iranians’ lives.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahnaz Sekechi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychosocial StudiesBirkbeck, University of LondonLondonUK

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