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Framework for Global Approaches to Peace: An Introduction

  • Aigul KulnazarovaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In the period of transition to a post-industrial, multipolar world order and the further development of society, it is important to build a framework paradigm for different approaches to peace to generate new ways of thinking and better understanding of the theoretical and practical goals of peace and peacebuilding from different perspectives and conditions in which they can be realized and expanded. While international relations traditionally focuses on the interstate level of analysis, peace studies tends to emphasize the importance of social relations. This chapter seeks to outline what could be the groundwork to build a framework for global approaches to peace. It also analyzes the major areas of relevant research that exists, to provide a hint for future investigations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tama UniversityKanagawaJapan

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