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The Earth Is Not “Ours” to Save

  • Nathan Snaza
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Educational Futures book series (PSEF)

Abstract

The Anthropocene, as theorized by Dipesh Chakrabarty and Timothy Morton, attempts to name the fact that the human has become a geological actor. Much of the contemporary discourse around environmentalism and climate change calls for humans to act in particular ways to avoid a catastrophe in an imagined future. Even as a case can be made that the catastrophe has already happened, my point of departure in this chapter will be this simple claim: that thinking human action can avert climate-related catastrophe is, in the most obvious way, a re-assertion of the human’s status as geological actant. The earth is not “ours,” even to save.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathan Snaza
    • 1
  1. 1.University of RichmondRichmondUSA

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