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Survivorship

  • Paula M. Termuhlen
  • Ruth E. Westra
Chapter

Abstract

There are over 15 million people in the United States who are alive today after completing treatment for cancer. It has been recognized that there is a continuum of experience after a diagnosis of cancer that impacts the overall health and quality of life of each person and family affected by it. In particular, the period of time after completion of active treatment has been recognized as a unique phase known as survivorship as patients transition from a focus on cancer to a focus on wellness. All patients with cancer have varying levels of distress which can be managed if properly assessed. As patients return to full function in society, support tools to help them understand their treatments and future risks have been developed. Coordination of care between the patient, oncology team, and primary care team remains a challenging but intensely desired goal. Cancer program accreditation standards have been created to help improve outcomes of care for this ever-growing group of people.

Keywords

Cancer survivor Survivorship Survivorship care plan Quality of life Distress management Treatment summary Posttreatment surveillance plan Distress assessment Psychosocial health Cancer prevention Cancer recurrence Coordination of care Evidence-based clinical guidelines Commission on Cancer (CoC) Institute of Medicine (IOM) 

Abbreviations

AHRQ

Agency for Health Care Research and Quality

ASCO

American Society of Clinical Oncology

CoC

Commission on Cancer

FP

Family physician

IOM

Institute of Medicine

NCCN

National Comprehensive Cancer Network

NCI

National Cancer Institute

PCP

Primary care provider

SCP

Survivorship care plan

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth CampusDuluthUSA
  2. 2.Department of Family Medicine and Community HealthUniversity of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth CampusDuluthUSA

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