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Introduction

  • Joseph da Silva
Chapter

Abstract

This book brings seminal studies in architecture and curriculum into conversation to fill in the blanks in the history of US schooling about the combined impact of schoolhouse design and curriculum in the educational relation. To better articulate this formative relationship, it suggests that the physical environment of the school and the ideas taught within it intersect to create what I term an ideo-spatial nexus of school design . Crucially, this nexus always forecasts a particular kind of student—a learning subject whose ways of thinking and being a school design limits.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph da Silva
    • 1
  1. 1.Bristol Community CollegeTivertonUSA

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