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Coastal Ocean Observing Data Quality Assurance and Quality Control, Data Validation, Databases, and Data Presentation

  • Jorge E. Corredor
Chapter

Abstract

High value of instrumental databases is attained and maintained through a rigorous quality assurance/quality control program involving care of the instrument and sensors to assure the quality of the data stream, careful instrument calibration, and continuous data quality control to ensure that data is flowing and to detect spikes and data gaps or instrument drift. In the case of remote sensing or numerical model databases, vicarious calibration or field validation is required. Instrument data and metadata are stored digitally using prescribed character codes and database formats that facilitate retrieval and visualization of selected data packets from large databases. Value of the data to the user is affirmed when knowledge is extracted from the data packet through visualization of data products that may include tables or time series data but most usually consist of a combination of graphics and text.

Keywords

Quality assurance Quality control Data validation Skill assessment Databases Data visualization 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jorge E. Corredor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Marine Sciences (retired)University of Puerto RicoMayagüezPuerto Rico

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