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SUPERhip and SUPERhip2 Procedures for Congenital Femoral Deficiency

  • Dror Paley
Chapter

Abstract

Congenital femoral deficiency (CFD) presents a spectrum of deficiency, deformity and dysplasia of the upper femur, hip joint and acetabulum. The Paley classification divides this spectrum into separate pathoanatomical groups that can be treated using discreetly different operative procedures specific to the pathoanatomy of each type of CFD. The SUPERhip1 procedure is used to reconstruct Paley type 1 CFD cases, while the SUPERhip2 procedure is used to reconstruct Paley type 2 CFD cases.

Keywords

SUPERhip CFD Congenital femoral deficiency Coxa vara Femoral neck pseudarthrosis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author wishes to thank Pamela Boullier Ross, who created all of the illustrations used in this chapter. The author would also like to thank the Paley Foundation for funding the cost of the illustrations and for giving permission to Springer for their use in this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Paley Orthopedic and Spine InstituteSt. Mary’s Medical CenterWest Palm BeachUSA

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