Advertisement

‘I Grow More & More Poetic’: Virginia Woolf and Prose Poetry

  • Jane Goldman
Chapter

Abstract

This essay begins by considering how we might claim Woolf as a poet in prose and a writer of prose poetry, rather than a poetic novelist. It closes with the findings of research by creative practice, a poem sourced in the systematic harvesting of her journal and diary entries on poets, poetry, and poetics. Observed are attempts, such as that of Jackson Mac Low, to transform Woolf’s writing into poems. Woolf’s ‘BLUE & GREEN’ is analysed as a prose poem, drawing on her readings in French symbolism, and her key essays examining the inter-related work of poetry and prose are also considered. Systematic creative research into her recorded utterances on poetry and poetics evidences that Woolf did ‘grow more & more poetic’ while pioneering a new literary form.

Works Cited

  1. Bell, Quentin. Virginia Woolf: A Biography. London: Hogarth, 1972.Google Scholar
  2. de la Mare, Walter. Poetry in Prose: Warton Lecture on Poetry. London: British Academy, 1935.Google Scholar
  3. Gillespie, Diane Filby. The Sisters’ Arts: The Writing and Painting of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
  4. Goldman, Jane. “Discovery Woolf.” In The Voyage Out: An Anthology, edited by Kirsty Gunn and Gail Low. Dundee: The Voyage Out Press, 2016.Google Scholar
  5. Mac Low, Jackson. The Virginia Woolf Poems. Providence: Burning Deck Press, 1985.Google Scholar
  6. Mallarmé, Stéphane. POÈME: Un coup de dés jamais n’abolira le hazard. Paris: La Nouvelle Revue Francais, 1914. https://math.dartmouth.edu/~doyle/docs/coup/scan/coup.pdf.
  7. ———. Poems. Translated by Roger Fry. London: Chatto & Windus, 1936.Google Scholar
  8. Preminger, Alex, ed. Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetics, Enlarged Edition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1974.Google Scholar
  9. Williams, Rhian. The Poetry Toolkit: The Essential Guide to Studying Poetry, Second Edition. London: Bloomsbury, 2013.Google Scholar
  10. Woolf, Virginia. Two Stories. London: Hogarth, 1919.Google Scholar
  11. ———. Monday or Tuesday. London: Hogarth, 1921.Google Scholar
  12. ———. Jacob’s Room. London: Hogarth, 1922.Google Scholar
  13. ———. Mrs. Dalloway. London: Hogarth, 1925.Google Scholar
  14. ———. A Room of One’s Own. London: Hogarth, 1929.Google Scholar
  15. ———. The Waves. London: Hogarth, 1931.Google Scholar
  16. ———. Roger Fry: A Biography. London: Hogarth, 1940.Google Scholar
  17. ———. Between the Acts. London: Hogarth, 1941.Google Scholar
  18. ———. The Diary of Virginia Woolf (5 vols.). Edited by Anne Olivier Bell and Andrew McNeillie. London: Hogarth, 1977–1984.Google Scholar
  19. ———. The Complete Shorter Fiction of Virginia Woolf. Edited by Susan Dick. London: Hogarth, 1985.Google Scholar
  20. ———. The Essays of Virginia Woolf. Edited by Andrew McNeillie (vols. 1–4) and Stuart N. Clarke (vols. 5–6). London: Hogarth, 1986–2011.Google Scholar
  21. ———. A Passionate Apprentice: The Early Journals. Edited by Mitchell Leaska. London: Hogarth, 1990.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Goldman
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GlasgowGlasgowScotland

Personalised recommendations