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Prose Poetry and the Spirit of Jazz

  • N. Santilli
Chapter

Abstract

Prose poetry is considered as a ‘jazzing up’ of contemporary literature in this essay by Nikki Santilli. The relationship is established through Baudelaire’s Preface to his Little Prose Poems and found awkwardly played out in Oscar Wilde’s pseudo-biblical tales. Santilli distinguishes between ‘ragging’ and ‘jazzing’ as different ways in which prose poets disrupt and play with source texts. The essay goes on to address late twentieth-century work by Tom Raworth and Roy Fisher, offering new perspectives on the ways in which prose poetry plays with traditional forms. Concluding with work by Patience Agbabi, Santilli shows that prose poetry has not lost any of its non-conformist nature and, as such, continues to be a relevant, if not the ideal, form to host twenty-first-century issues such as gender fluidity.

Works Cited

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Santilli
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ScholarLondonUK

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