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The Importance of the Services Sector for Africa

  • Ottavia Pesce
  • Carolyne Tumuhimbise
  • William DavisEmail author
  • Lily Sommer
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies of Sustainable Business in Africa book series (PSSBA)

Abstract

The chapter reviews recent empirical evidence on the importance of the services sector for Africa, with a particular focus on financial and infrastructure services. The chapter begins by reviewing the general literature on the importance of a competitive services sector for development, followed by evidence from developing countries and Africa in particular, including the correlations between growth in services and general growth. Subsequent to this, the chapter reviews literature on the importance of financial and infrastructure services, in particular for development.

The chapter then turns to giving an overview of the role of the services sector in the African economy, surveying trends and quantitative evidence and experiences from individual African countries. It concludes with a look at the importance of services for Africa’s development priorities, and areas for further research.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Stephen Karingi, Tama R. Lisinge and Marie T. Guiebo for advice that helped with the writing of this chapter. The chapter draws on work conducted in preparation for the UNCTAD Multi-Year Expert Meeting on Services in 2014, and on work conducted in support of Economic Report on Africa 2015.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this chapter are the authors’ own and do not necessarily reflect those of their respective institutions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ottavia Pesce
    • 1
  • Carolyne Tumuhimbise
    • 2
  • William Davis
    • 3
    Email author
  • Lily Sommer
    • 4
  1. 1.United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western AsiaBeirutLebanon
  2. 2.International Organization for MigrationAddis AbabaEthiopia
  3. 3.Economic Commission for AfricaAddis AbabaEthiopia
  4. 4.African Trade Policy Centre of the Economic Commission for AfricaAddis AbabaEthiopia

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