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Language Teachers on Study Abroad Programmes: The Characteristics and Strategies of Those Most Likely to Increase Their Intercultural Communicative Competence

  • Deborah CorderEmail author
  • Annelies Roskvist
  • Sharon Harvey
  • Karen Stacey
Chapter

Abstract

Intercultural communicative language learning and teaching requires teachers to be reasonably interculturally competent. Research indicates the potential of study/residence abroad programmes for the development of intercultural communicative competence (ICC). However, the research focusses largely on students rather than on teachers. This chapter analyses data from a New Zealand (NZ) Ministry of Education–commissioned study into language teachers’ gains from language and culture immersion programmes and the characteristics and strategies likely to increase ICC. Case studies of three NZ teachers’ sojourns between 2008 and 2011 in China, France, and Germany for three weeks, one year, and one month, respectively, are used for in-depth interpretative exploration. Findings indicate a complex interplay of personal and professional identities, worldviews, life experience, psychological and emotional factors, and their implications for professional development.

Keywords

Intercultural communicative competence Language teachers Immersion programmes Study abroad Transformative learning Cultural intelligence Sojourner China France Germany New Zealand 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Corder
    • 1
    Email author
  • Annelies Roskvist
    • 1
  • Sharon Harvey
    • 1
  • Karen Stacey
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Language and CultureAuckland University of TechnologyAucklandNew Zealand

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