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The Opposition: From Third Party Back to Third Force

  • Robert J. Pekkanen
  • Steven R. Reed
Chapter

Abstract

Since the Liberal Democratic Party’s return to power after the 2012 election, the weakness of the opposition parties is one of the most important storylines in Japanese politics. The collapse and fragmentation of opposition forces between the 2014 and 2017 elections is integral to understanding the LDP’s victory in 2017. The 2014 opposition leaders, the Democratic Party of Japan and Ishin, were supplanted in 2017 by two parties created just prior to the election: the liberal Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (CDP) and the more conservative Party of Hope.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Pekkanen
    • 1
  • Steven R. Reed
    • 2
  1. 1.Jackson School of International StudiesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Faculty of Policy StudiesChuo UniversityHachiojiJapan

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