The Cricket Bubble: Notes on a Cricketing Lifestyle

  • Harry C. R. Bowles
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is a thematic account of the cricketing lifestyle university cricket exposed its young cricketers to. A major focus of the chapter being players’ reactions to their cricketing socialisation as they familiarised themselves with what a future in cricket might look and feel like. Alongside a description of the cricketing routine players were exposed to during the season, the chapter highlights the type of demands and personal adjustment required of players by their cricking aspirations.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry C. R. Bowles
    • 1
  1. 1.Cyncoed CampusCardiff Metropolitan UniversityCardiffUK

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