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‘Taking the Linguistic Method Seriously’: On Iris Murdoch on Language and Linguistic Philosophy

  • Niklas Forsberg
Chapter
Part of the Philosophers in Depth book series (PID)

Abstract

This chapter brings together Murdoch’s thoughts about language with other central aspects of her thought such as love, attention, perfectionism and morality. By making clear how Murdoch’s variety of linguistic philosophy differs from contemporary philosophy of language, this paper also shows that Murdoch’s philosophy contains the seeds for a fruitful form of philosophizing which brings the moral and aesthetic dimensions of language into view. “Taking the linguistic method seriously” means making clear the ways in which all concepts belong to a fabric that is changing on a personal level as well as an historical one. One of the things that Murdoch can help us see is that one problem with contemporary philosophy of language, is that it does not take the linguistic method seriously enough.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Niklas Forsberg
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Ethics as Study in Human Value, University of PardubicePardubiceCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Philosophy, Uppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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