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Citizens’ Activism and Solidarity Movements in Contemporary Europe: Contending with Populism

  • Birte Siim
  • Aino Saarinen
  • Anna Krasteva
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in European Political Sociology book series (PSEPS)

Abstract

The introduction by Birte Siim, Anna Krasteva, and Aino Saarinen situates the book within the scholarly literature and European research. It is inspired by the challenges to understand the new forms of national populism linked to globalization, European integration, migration, and multiculturality/multiculturalism. The transformation of the political landscape, deconstruction of welfare states, and growth of exclusive nationalisms across Europe following the immigration and “refugee crisis” present a challenge to counterforces and solidarity movements to combat othering and exclusion. Hate speech and hate acts flourish, even in regimes that have previously been characterized as tolerant and inclusive. The aim is to make counterforces to right-wing populism in civil society visible and reflect critically on concepts such as citizenship, democracy, social movements, conflicts, and cooperation around race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class.

Keywords

Welfare national chauvinism Welfare exclusionism Counterforces Social movements Acts of citizenship Intersectionality Transversal dialogues Deliberative mini-publics 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Birte Siim
    • 1
  • Aino Saarinen
    • 2
  • Anna Krasteva
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Culture and Global StudiesAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark
  2. 2.Aleksanteri InstituteHelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.Department of Political SciencesNew Bulgarian UniversitySofiaBulgaria

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