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Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs and Struggles over Legitimation

  • Tereza Kuldova
  • James Quinn
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Risk, Crime and Society book series (PSRCS)

Abstract

Legitimation of the informal power of transnational outlaw motorcycle clubs worldwide vis-à-vis the public is becoming an increasing concern for the clubs. Using our research material from the US and Europe, we ask if the use of these strategies of legitimation can be seen in terms of increasing integration of this counterculture into society and the progressive consolidation and entrepreneurialism of the clubs. Specifically, the chapter engages with the increased (1) public relations work of the leading clubs worldwide, activities that could be labeled as (2) ‘corporate social responsibility’ and charity work, and finally (3) the biker lobby that addresses the mainstream political structures and defends libertarian positions with the help of legal professionals.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tereza Kuldova
    • 1
    • 2
  • James Quinn
    • 3
  1. 1.University of OsloBlindernNorway
  2. 2.University of ViennaViennaAustria
  3. 3.Independent ResearcherDentonUSA

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