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Introduction: Scheming Legality and Resisting Criminalization

  • Tereza Kuldova
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Risk, Crime and Society book series (PSRCS)

Abstract

How do outlaw motorcycle clubs and street gangs integrate into society? Often labelled as ‘deviant,’ this volume challenges this notion and argues that these groups are far better integrated into mainstream society than generally assumed. Nor are they mere passive victims of labelling, as some theories would suggest. The introduction investigates two crucial notions, those of ‘scheming legality’ and ‘resisting criminalization,’ which we suggest are necessary to take into consideration when thinking through ‘outlaw’ groups at large and which have so far remained understudied. It does so by tying together all the contributions in the volume, something that allows the reader to see not only how the chapters speak to each other, but also how complex these phenomena are. In the process, it encourages the reader to consider how these groups create strategies of self-representation that resist the dominant narratives of media, police and governments.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tereza Kuldova
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of OsloBlindernNorway
  2. 2.University of ViennaViennaAustria

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