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Overview of Small-Scale Fisheries in Latin America and the Caribbean: Challenges and Prospects

  • Mirella de Oliveira LeisEmail author
  • María José Barragán-Paladines
  • Alicia Saldaña
  • David Bishop
  • Jae Hong Jin
  • Vesna Kereži
  • Melinda Agapito
  • Ratana Chuenpagdee
Chapter
Part of the MARE Publication Series book series (MARE, volume 19)

Abstract

The importance of small-scale fisheries in Latin America and the Caribbean has been widely recognized in terms of income, livelihoods, and food security for more than two million people. The highly diverse ecosystems and multiple species found within this region determine the variety of fishing techniques, gears, and target species, as discussed in this chapter. These diverse and complex characteristics pose challenges to the region’s governing systems, which may lack the technical and financial resources to cope with the numerous resulting management and governance challenges. These pressures are further exacerbated when fisheries assessment and monitoring are poorly conducted, adding uncertainty in relation to the status of the ecosystem and fish stocks. Small-scale fisheries activities thus have become vulnerable in the face of various challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. Current efforts to enhance small-scale fisheries viability and sustainability in Latin America and the Caribbean include the adoption of innovative management approaches that focus on the entire ecosystems rather than on single species and that acknowledge the concerns of local stakeholders in decision-making through strategies such as collaboration with the government in co-management arrangements. Although many of these co-management arrangements in the region are still nascent, this chapter highlights that fishers and their organizations play a significant role in responsible resource governance through exercising ecosystem stewardship.

Keywords

Latin America and the Caribbean Small-scale fisheries Governance Viability Sustainability Environmental stewardship 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Funding for the research is provided by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) to “Too Big To Ignore Global Partnership for Small-Scale Fisheries Research” partnership grant (grant number 895-2011-1011) and Memorial University of Newfoundland. We thank the reviewers for the comments and acknowledge the editorial help of Brennan Lowery.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mirella de Oliveira Leis
    • 1
    Email author
  • María José Barragán-Paladines
    • 2
  • Alicia Saldaña
    • 1
  • David Bishop
    • 1
  • Jae Hong Jin
    • 1
  • Vesna Kereži
    • 1
  • Melinda Agapito
    • 1
  • Ratana Chuenpagdee
    • 1
  1. 1.Too Big To Ignore Global Partnership for Small-Scale Fisheries Research, Memorial University of NewfoundlandSt. John’sCanada
  2. 2.Development and Knowledge Sociology-Social Science DepartmentLeibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT)BremenGermany

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