The Off-Duty Threat

Chapter

Abstract

Terrorists adopted a strategy of attacking officers when they were off duty. 28% of officers were killed when off duty. This is a considerably high percentage and reflects the emphasis that terrorists placed on this form of targeting. Officers were killed in a variety of contexts: travelling to and returning from work; whilst socialising; attending church; and some were murdered in the presence of their wives and children. A frequently used means of attacking officers was the undercar booby-trap device. Unlike soldiers who live in heavily protected barracks, police officers lived in unfortified homes and therefore experienced a greater degree of vulnerability. The chapter accounts for the off-duty threat and how it was responded to by officers.

Keywords

Off-duty threat Undercar booby trap Terrorist targeting strategy Counter-terrorist precautions 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Sociology and PoliticsSheffield Hallam UniversitySheffieldUK

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