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The Restored New Testament of Willis Barnstone

  • Philip Wilson
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting book series (PTTI)

Abstract

In this chapter Wilson considers literary translation as restoration, as evidenced by the 2009 The Restored New Testament by Willis Barnstone (1927–). Bible translation has been of great importance in the history of Western translation, and Barnstone’s career and translation project are contextualised within tradition, viewing the Hellenistic Greek New Testament as a set of literary texts. The chapter brings out four aspects of Barnstone’s target text, using them as a basis to discuss issues that are raised by literary translation: the order and selection of texts; the translation of names; translation as poetry; the use of paratext. A conclusion addresses the relevance of Barnstone’s text within the field.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of East AngliaNorwichUK

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