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Eradicating Extremism: A Ten Cs Approach

  • Dan Kuwali
Chapter

Abstract

Political instability that creates power vacuum and security gaps, discrimination, religious marginalisation, economic penury, social crisis and the proliferation of small arms and light weapons has contributed to the breeding of extremist groups in Africa. Using force alone to curb extremism can exacerbate the problem, hence the need for a multi-pronged approach that includes methods to win hearts and minds. To counter violent extremism, there is need for dialogues across faiths, cultures, political groupings and countries. To this end, leaders, clerics and scholars at all levels should devise effective strategies to tackle the root causes of extremism and terrorism. The idea is to cultivate a culture of peace, tolerance and acceptance of unity in diversity using diverse African values. In doing so, governments should provide a conducive forum to debunk and correct misinterpreted political and religious ideologies, as well as cutting access to funding by potentially violent extremist groups. States should confront socio-economic grievances by promoting broad-based economic growth and development; fighting corruption; job creation for the youth, including women and girls, without discrimination; and devoting more resources to education, which is one of the most effective tools that can eradicate extremist attitudes. This paper advances a 10 Cs approach to eradicating extremism in Africa by way of (1) conflict prevention through broad-based socio-economic development, (2) countering extremism with respect for human rights and humanitarian law, (3) capability of security agents to protect populations at risk, (4) community empowerment to deter extremist groups and control borders, (5) choking off extremists’ financing, (6) combating corruption and promoting the rule of law and good governance, (7) curbing terrorist propaganda and recruitment through the Internet, (8) counter-radicalisation and de-radicalisation programmes, (9) condemning violence and correcting misinterpretations and (10) communication through cross- and intra-cultural, faith and political dialogue.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan Kuwali
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Human Rights, University of PretoriaPretoriaSouth Africa

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