Advertisement

The Ethics of Allowing Participants to Be Named in Critical Research with Indigenous Peoples in Colonised Settings: Examples from Health Research with Māori

  • Jacob Ashdown
  • Paris Pidduck
  • Tia N. Neha
  • Elizabeth Schaughency
  • Brian Dixon
  • Claire E. Aitken
  • Gareth J. Treharne
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we compare two projects with Māori participants that highlight ethical issues related to offering indigenous participants the opportunity to be named in research outputs. In the first project, children taking part in a photo-elicitation study all agreed to be named following an ongoing process of confirmation. In the second project, we decided not to offer men with a history of criminal offending the opportunity to be named because of the potential for future harm to the men and past victims. Using these two examples and existing indigenous scholarship, we discuss issues for researchers, indigenous community members, and ethics committees to bear in mind when considering whether it is appropriate to offer indigenous participants the opportunity to be named in a particular study.

Notes

Authors’ Note

Jacob and Paris led the two projects that form the basis of this chapter. Jacob carried out background research on the studies that have addressed naming of participants and wrote several sections of the chapter. Paris carried out background research on kaupapa Māori research and wrote several sections of the chapter. Tia, Elizabeth, Claire, and Brian all contributed to the research described in the chapter and to its conception and editing. Gareth oversaw the two projects, carried out background research on the studies that have addressed naming of participants, and wrote several sections of the chapter. We thank Mihi Ratima and two reviewers for their feedback on the chapter. We also thank participants and their whānau for their involvement in our research. Jacob’s research was supported by a Henry Rongomau Bennett Foundation scholarship. Paris’ research was supported by a Health Research Council Master’s scholarship.

Glossary of Terms

Aotearoa

the land of the long white cloud; New Zealand

Hapū

subtribe(s)

Hui

meeting(s)

Iwi

tribe(s)

Kaupapa

approach, principles

Kuia

female elder(s)

Māori

the indigenous peoples of Aotearoa/New Zealand

Mātauranga

knowledge, wisdom

Pākehā

non-Māori (commonly specific to European New Zealanders)

Pepeha

tribal saying describing the person’s whakapapa

Rohe

tribal boundaries

Tamaiti

child

Tamariki

children

Te Reo Māori

the Māori language

Te Tiriti o Waitangi

The Treaty of Waitangi

Tino rangatiratanga

absolute sovereignty, chieftainship, authority, self-determination

Whakamā

embarrassed, shy

Whakapapa

ancestry or genealogy, commonly recounted in a pepeha

Whānau

extended family/families

Whare

house(s)

References

  1. Andrae, D., McIntosh, T., & Coster, S. (2016). Marginalised: An insider’s view of the state, state policies in New Zealand and gang formation. Critical Criminology. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10612-016-9325-8
  2. Ashdown, J. (2016). He tirohanga i te oranga o ngā tāngata whai ora o te hapori haumanu o te Whare Moana [Māori men’s perspectives of rehabilitation in the Moana House therapeutic community: A qualitative enquiry]. Unpublished master’s thesis. Dunedin, Aotearoa/New Zealand: University of Otago.Google Scholar
  3. Bosworth, M., Campbell, D., Demby, B., Ferranti, S., & Santos, M. (2005). Doing prison research: Views from the inside. Qualitative Inquiry, 11, 249–264. https://doi.org/10.1177/1077800404273410 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Delany, L., Ratima, M., & Morgaine, K. C. (2015). Ethics and health promotion. In L. Signal & M. Ratima (Eds.), Promoting health in Aotearoa/New Zealand (pp. 121–145). Dunedin, Aotearoa/New Zealand: Otago University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Giordano, J., O’Reilly, M., Taylor, H., & Dogra, N. (2007). Confidentiality and autonomy: The challenge(s) of offering research participants a choice of disclosing their identity. Qualitative Health Research, 17, 264–275. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732306297884 CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. Guenther, K. M. (2009). The politics of names: Rethinking the methodological and ethical significance of naming people, organizations, and places. Qualitative Research, 9, 411–421. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794109337872 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Hohneck, D. J. (2013). Building bridges: Seeking collaboration with a Māori community. Unpublished master’s thesis. Hamilton, Aotearoa/New Zealand: The University of Waikato.Google Scholar
  8. Hudson, M., Milne, M., Reynolds, P., Russell, K., & Smith, B. (2010). Te ara tika. Guidelines for Māori research ethics: A framework for researchers and ethics committee members. Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand: Health Research Council. Retrieved Jun 16, 2017, from http://www.hrc.govt.nz/sites/default/files/Te%20Ara%20Tika%20Guidelines%20for%20Maori%20Research%20Ethics.pdf
  9. Hudson, M. L., & Russell, K. (2009). The Treaty of Waitangi and research ethics in Aotearoa. Bioethical Inquiry, 6, 61–68. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11673-008-9127-0 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Kovach, M. E. (2010). Indigenous methodologies: Characteristics, conversations, and contexts. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  11. Mahuika, R. (2011). Anō, ko te riu ōtāne mahuta: Possibilities and challenges in a Ngāti Rangiwewehi curriculum. Unpublished master’s thesis. Hamilton, Aotearoa/New Zealand: The University of Waikato.Google Scholar
  12. McLellan, K. M. (2013). The experiences of Māori with aphasia, their whānau members and speech-language therapists. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand: The University of Auckland.Google Scholar
  13. Michie, M. G. (2011). Working across cultures in indigenous science education. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Hamilton, Aotearoa/New Zealand: The University of Waikato.Google Scholar
  14. Nespor, J. (2000). Anonymity and place in qualitative inquiry. Qualitative Inquiry, 6, 546–569. https://doi.org/10.1177/107780040000600408 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. O’Carroll, A. D. (2013). Kanohi ki te kanohi—A thing of the past? An examination of Māori use of social networking sites and the implications for Māori culture and society. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Palmerston North, Aotearoa/New Zealand: Massey University.Google Scholar
  16. Ogden, R. (2008a). Anonymity. In L. M. Given (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of qualitative research methods (p. 17). London: SAGE.Google Scholar
  17. Ogden, R. (2008b). Harm. In L. M. Given (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of qualitative research methods (pp. 379–380). London: SAGE.Google Scholar
  18. Ogden, R. (2008c). Pseudonym. In L. M. Given (Ed.), The SAGE encyclopedia of qualitative research methods (p. 693). London: SAGE.Google Scholar
  19. Olson, R. E. (2013). Relocating childbirth: The politics of birth place and Aboriginal midwifery in Manitoba, Canada. Unpublished PhD thesis, University of Sussex, Brighton.Google Scholar
  20. Orange, C. (2011). The Treaty of Waitangi (2nd ed.). New Zealand: Bridget Williams Books.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Pidduck, P. (2016). What do tamariki have to say about hauora? A qualitative study using photography. Unpublished master’s thesis. Dunedin, Aotearoa/New Zealand: University of Otago.Google Scholar
  22. Roth, W. M., Tobin, K., Elmesky, R., Carambo, C., McKnight, Y. M., & Beers, J. (2004). Re/making identities in the praxis of urban schooling: A cultural historical perspective. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 11, 48–69. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327884mca1101_4 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Scarth, B. J. (2016). Bereaved participants’ reasons for wanting their real names used in thanatology research. Research Ethics, 12, 80–96. https://doi.org/10.1177/1747016115599569 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Smith, L. T. (2012). Decolonizing methodologies (2nd ed.). Dunedin: Otago University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Tamati, A., Hond-Flavell, E., Korewha, H., & the whānau of Te Kōpae Piripono. (2008). Centre of Innovation research report of Te Kōpae Piripono. Wellington, Aotearoa/New Zealand: Ministry of Education. Retrieved Jun 16, 2017, from https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/ECE/22551/34830
  26. Tilley, L., & Woodthorpe, K. (2011). Is it the end for anonymity as we know it? A critical examination of the ethical principle of anonymity in the context of 21st century demands on the qualitative researcher. Qualitative Research, 11, 197–212. https://doi.org/10.1177/1468794110394073 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. University of Otago. (n.d.). Application form for ethical consideration of research and teaching proposals involving human participants. Retrieved Jun 16, 2017, from http://www.otago.ac.nz/council/committees/committees/otago618289.docx
  28. van den Hoonaard, W. C. (2003). Is anonymity an artifact in ethnographic research? Journal of Academic Ethics, 1, 141–151. https://doi.org/10.1023/B:JAET.0000006919.58804.4c CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. van den Hoonaard, W. C. (2011). The seduction of ethics: Transforming the social sciences. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.Google Scholar
  30. Waikari, A. (2011). A way forward for te reo Māori in English-medium education. Unpublished master’s thesis. Hamilton, Aotearoa/New Zealand: The University of Waikato.Google Scholar
  31. Walford, G. (2005). Research ethical guidelines and anonymity. International Journal of Research and Method in Education, 28, 83–93. https://doi.org/10.1080/01406720500036786 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Wilkinson, S., & Kitzinger, C. (2013). Representing our own experience issues in “insider” research. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 37, 251–255. https://doi.org/10.1177/0361684313483111 CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacob Ashdown
    • 1
  • Paris Pidduck
    • 2
  • Tia N. Neha
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Schaughency
    • 3
  • Brian Dixon
    • 4
  • Claire E. Aitken
    • 5
  • Gareth J. Treharne
    • 3
  1. 1.Moana House and University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand
  2. 2.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  3. 3.University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand
  4. 4.University of Otago and Moana HouseDunedinNew Zealand
  5. 5.Moana HouseDunedinNew Zealand

Personalised recommendations