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Energy Efficient Ship Operation Through Speed Optimisation in Various Weather Conditions

  • Tong CuiEmail author
  • Benjamin Howett
  • Mingyu Kim
  • Ruihua Lu
  • Yigit Kemal Demirel
  • Osman Turan
  • Sandy Day
  • Atilla Incecik
Chapter
Part of the WMU Studies in Maritime Affairs book series (WMUSTUD, volume 6)

Abstract

Speed optimisation or speed management has been an attractive topic in the shipping industry for a long time. Traditional methods rely on masters’ experience. Some recent methods are more efficient but have many constraints, which preclude obtaining an optimum speed profile. This paper introduces a relatively advanced model for global speed optimisation towards energy efficient shipping in various weather conditions and shows the effect when the method is employed. With this model, if a ship type, departure and destination ports and fixed ETA (Estimated Time Arrival) are given, the stakeholders can be provided with a more reasonable speed operation plan for a certain commercial route, which leads to lower fuel consumption. Weather conditions and, hence, routing plays a very important role in this process. Several case studies over different shipping conditions are considered to validate the model.

Keywords

Speed optimisation Weather routing Energy efficiency 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is part of the project: Shipping in Changing Climates (EPSRC Grant no. EP/K039253/1). The author would like to express sincere thanks for the support from UK Research Council, University of Strathclyde and China Scholarship Council.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tong Cui
    • 1
    Email author
  • Benjamin Howett
    • 1
  • Mingyu Kim
    • 1
  • Ruihua Lu
    • 1
  • Yigit Kemal Demirel
    • 1
  • Osman Turan
    • 1
  • Sandy Day
    • 1
  • Atilla Incecik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine EngineeringUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowUK

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