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Global Mass Society

  • Michael Haas
Chapter

Abstract

Economic globalization has resulted in corporations, unaccountable to states, making key decisions within an otherwise anarchic world order, rendering normal democratic functioning almost impossible. Global gridlock has resulted from the same issues that plague democracies today. Although transnational civil society has tried to achieve a degree of democratic global governance, the result mostly has been to reinforce the global power structure.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Haas
    • 1
  1. 1.Los AngelesUSA

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