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Digital Echoes pp 267-281 | Cite as

Presenting the Intangible: Curating the Intangible Cultural Heritage in the Museum Practice—Legal Aspects

  • Teodora Konach
Chapter

Abstract

Advanced technological processes have facilitated the commercial exploitation of the manifestations, knowledge and skills that make up intangible cultural heritage (ICH) on an unprecedented scale. The complexity of ICH makes it difficult to create effective tools for legal protection. Although the 2003 UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage provides broad definitions, it lacks specific rules on ownership of ICH and its exploitation and curation in heritage institutions. The article aims to retrace the place of ICH in the museum practice in relation to the recent developments in intellectual property law and the new role of local communities in the processes of ICH safeguarding.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teodora Konach
    • 1
  1. 1.Jagiellonian UniversityKrakówPoland

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