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Regional Leadership and Contestation: Strategic Reactions to the Rise of the BRICS

  • Hannes Ebert
  • Daniel Flemes
Chapter

Abstract

How do rising regional powers translate regional military dominance or economic superiority into political leadership, and how do secondary regional powers respond? The chapter addresses these questions in four steps. First, it discusses the evolving International Relations (IR) Security Studies scholarship on contested leadership and identifies the research gaps of regional void, conceptual ambiguity, structural bias, and inattention to change in this literature. Second, it defines primary and secondary regional powers and develops a concept of contested leadership. Third, it outlines how the volume’s individual chapters address the research gaps. Finally, it compares their findings and joint contributions to the broader study of contested leadership in IR.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hannes Ebert
    • 1
  • Daniel Flemes
    • 1
  1. 1.GIGA German Institute of Global and Area StudiesHamburgGermany

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