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Human Trafficking Prevention Efforts for Kids (NEST)

  • Yvonne G. WilliamsEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Problem statement: There are 100,000 children exploited through prostitution annually in the United States (Shared Hope International, The National Report on Domestic Sex Trafficking (America’s Prostituted Children, 2009)). The average age of entry is 13 (Shared Hope International, The National Report on Domestic Sex Trafficking (America’s Prostituted Children, 2009)). While these statistics do not apply to labor and other forms of trafficking, research reveals that where there is labor trafficking there is also a high degree of sex trafficking.

Motivation: The horrendous abuse that children endure from being trafficking, coupled with the overwhelming costs to society in financing restorative programs, criminal activity including incarceration and court costs, and loss of human productivity, makes this a modern-day crisis. In January 2015, an FBI source stated that human trafficking is most likely the number one criminal enterprise in the world today.

Approach: Heather Tuininga, founder of 1010 Strategies, discovered and used analysis of field data stating that 74–86% of the men who purchase sex did so for the first time before the age of 25. We determined if we can prevent boys from purchasing, we can end sex trafficking for the next generation.

Results: We created an electronic platform of human trafficking prevention education via curriculum and resources for K-12 educators to implement in their classrooms that present balanced and evidence-based data.

Conclusions: The current response has been extremely favorable. We have received reports from curriculum providers whose programs have been introduced into the classroom showing an exceptionally high amount of success stories, including some disclosures from students who were being trafficked, in the process of being groomed, and/or abused.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Network for Cultural Change, Inc. (NCC)LecantoUSA
  2. 2.National Educators to Stop Trafficking (NEST)DaytonUSA
  3. 3.Trafficking in America Task Force, Inc. (TIATF)GainesvilleUSA

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