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Scenographic Dramaturgy & Auteuring Adaptations

  • Melissa Poll
Chapter
Part of the Adaptation in Theatre and Performance book series (ATP)

Abstract

This chapter posits that Robert Lepage adapts extant texts through scenographic dramaturgy, a three-pronged, physical approach to adaptation comprised of historical-spatial mapping, architectonic scenography and kinetic texts. Through specific examples from a range of Lepage’s extant text productions (including the operas The Damnation of Faust and The Rake’s Progress), this chapter explores the signifying potential of Lepage’s scenographic dramaturgy in performance and positions his approach in the historical continuum of écriture scénique, the scenic writing aesthetic established by Adolphe Appia, Edward Gordon Craig and Bertolt Brecht, among others. Chapter  2 goes on to contextualize Lepage’s aesthetic signature by articulating a non-text-based definition of adaptation and unpacking the term auteur through its Western film and theatre etymology.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa Poll
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EnglishSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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