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Retail Crime pp 357-378 | Cite as

The Challenges to Preventing Losses in Retailing: Views from Retail Loss Prevention Managers and Directors

  • Martin Gill
Chapter
Part of the Crime Prevention and Security Management book series (CPSM)

Abstract

There has been relatively little research on the ways in which crime prevention decisions in the commercial environment take account of the need to protect people and property and other assets on the one hand, and yet don’t impede the commercial imperative on the other. This chapter explores the perspective of loss prevention managers. Perhaps one of the most striking findings is that it is the engagement of staff, the employees, that is seen as the key crime prevention approach. The benefits and drawbacks of various approaches are examined and some of the key influences on determining not just what works but what actually gets provided.

Keywords

Retail crime Retail loss prevention Managers and directors 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank the editors, an anonymous reviewer and Professor Adrian Beck for comments on earlier drafts of this chapter and Clint Reid for his support.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Gill
    • 1
  1. 1.Perpetuity Research & Consultancy International LtdTunbridge Wells KentUK

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