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Identifying Problematic Financial Behaviors and Money Disorders

  • Bradley T. Klontz
  • Derek R. Lawson
Chapter

Abstract

Money is the number one source of stress in the lives of Americans. Financial stress drives many clients to seek the assistance of financial counselors. In some cases, financial stress is not the sole result of a lack of financial resources or poor financial literacy and traditional financial counseling tools do not help clients change their behaviors. When financial counseling is not successful in helping improve a client’s financial behaviors, counselors may want to consider whether the client may be exhibiting signs of a money disorder. This chapter introduces the signs and symptoms of problematic money behaviors and money disorders, including hoarding disorder, gambling disorder, compulsive buying disorder, financial enabling, financial dependence, financial denial, and financial enmeshment. It examines the beliefs driving these behaviors and offers suggestions for financial counselors who encounter clients struggling with problematic financial behaviors and money disorders.

Keywords

Financial counseling Money disorders Hoarding disorder Gambling disorder Compulsive buying disorder Financial dependence Financial enabling Financial denial Financial enmeshment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bradley T. Klontz
    • 1
  • Derek R. Lawson
    • 2
  1. 1.Heider College of BusinessCreighton UniversityOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Personal Financial PlanningKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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