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Case 34: Globe Injury with Concurrent Intracranial Injury

  • Seanna Grob
  • Yoshihiro Yonekawa
  • Alison Callahan
  • Yewlin E. Chee
  • Carolyn Kloek
  • David Wu
  • Dean Eliott
  • John B. Miller
Chapter

Abstract

A 40-year-old man presented with concern for open globe injury in the right eye after his nail gun malfunctioned. He was found to have an 8.2-cm nail traversing the lateral orbit and penetrating the right frontal lobe. He was urgently evaluated by neurosurgery and subsequently underwent removal of the nail by a team including neurosurgery, oculoplastic surgery, and ocular trauma. Upon exploration of the globe, the patient was found to have a partial thickness scleral laceration with an injury to the lateral rectus muscle, which were repaired. Post-operatively, he was found to have a dilated examination concerning for sclopetaria, chorioretinal rupture. He later developed a retinal detachment and required several retinal surgeries due to recurrent retinal detachment before achieving a stable eye exam.

Keywords

Intracranial injury Intracranial foreign body Orbital foreign body Open globe exploration Neurosurgery consult 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seanna Grob
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Yonekawa
    • 2
  • Alison Callahan
    • 1
  • Yewlin E. Chee
    • 3
  • Carolyn Kloek
    • 1
  • David Wu
    • 1
  • Dean Eliott
    • 4
  • John B. Miller
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyHarvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and EarBostonUSA
  2. 2.Vitreoretinal SurgeryHarvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Boston Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Vitreoretinal Surgery, Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.Vitreoretinal Surgery, Department of OphthalmologyHarvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and EarBostonUSA

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