Demography of the Gulf Region

  • S. Irudaya Rajan
Chapter

Abstract

The economic development in post-1973 oil epoch in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries resulted in large-scale import of manpower from abroad due to an investment in education, healthcare, and sanitation by the GCC authorities. Given this context, this chapter examines the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the Gulf region and the role that migration has played in the Gulf economy. Among the South Asian nations, the higher share of migrants living in GCC countries to total migrants is from India, followed by Pakistan and Bangladesh. The pull factor was, of course, higher wages for the migrants along with the fact that the immigrants hailing from South Asia are willing to immigrate without their families. It is also evident that majority of non-nationals in GCC countries were confined to blue-collar jobs, but this is now changing, leading to brain drain from those countries. This chapter analyzes the role of migration from South Asian countries to the GCC region and its influences on the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the GCC countries.

Keywords

Demography South Asia Gulf Cooperation Council Migration Remittances 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Irudaya Rajan
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Development StudiesThiruvananthapuramIndia

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