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Language Planning: Theoretical Background

  • Ernest Andrews
Chapter

Abstract

Provides information on major aspects of the conceptual framework of language planning with a view to enabling the reader to gain a clearer understanding of language planning as both a concept and a set of activities in historical reality. Information introduced includes definition, typology and terminology of language planning, and motivations and methods in language-planning activity. An Addendum containing a synopsis of the historical origins of language planning and of the development and significance of language planning as a subject of scholarly inquiry, along with pertinent bibliographical data, is also included.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest Andrews
    • 1
  1. 1.BloomingtonUSA

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