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Victims and Victimhood in Reparation Programs: Lessons from Latin America

  • Jemima García-Godos
Chapter
Part of the St Antony's Series book series (STANTS)

Abstract

As a mechanism of transitional justice, victim reparations involve legal and administrative procedures for acknowledging victimhood and the granting of selected forms of redress based on specific definitions of victim and victimhood. Directed as they are towards victims, reparation programs have been implemented in a variety of settings, although not necessarily in the same way or applying the same categories of “victim” and “victimhood.” This chapter traces the development of victim reparation programs in Latin America since the 1980s, exploring the basis for victimhood they apply as well as the forms of reparation provided. The chapter argues that the concept of “victim” has expanded with regard to what is considered to be legitimate victimhood and who are considered legitimate victims. This development is accompanied by an expansion in the forms of reparation offered in reparations programs. The chapter discusses these developments in connection to the political character of victim reparations and their role in interpreting the past.

Keywords

Latin America Reparation programs Transitional justice Victim Victimhood 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jemima García-Godos
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Human GeographyUniversity of OsloOsloNorway

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